Glossary of Terms you will meet in the pursuit of Pioneering

pioneering-knot

ADZE
A cutting tool with a blade set at right angles to the handle. Used for shaping large timbers. A fine tool but difficult to learn to use.

ANCHORAGE
A fixed base; picket, tree, rock, or any secure object around which a rope can be tied and which will take a heavy weight or strain.

AUGUR
A carpenter’s tool used for boring holes in wood.

BECKET
A rope eye for the hook of a block. Also a rope grommet used as a rowlock or any small rope strop used as a handle.

BELAY
To make a rope or line fast by winding it in a figure of eight around a cleat, a belaying pin. Also; to stop or cease.

BELAYING PIN
A pin of either wood or metal set in such places as pin rails, etc. upon which to belay a rope or secure the running rigging.

BEND, TO
To fasten a rope to another rope or some other object.

BIGHT
A loop in a rope.

BILLHOOK
A thick, heavy knife with a hooked end, used for chopping brushwood.

BLOCK
A mechanical device consisting of a frame or shell, within which is mounted a sheave or roller over which a rope is run. There are many varieties of blocks which are at times called pulleys, or when rigged, a block and tackle, the name pulley, as used in connection with a block, is a misnomer in that in this case the word pulley refers only to the sheave or roller.

BLOCKS AND TACKLE
Two blocks, through which one continuous rope has been taken, so as to form an apparatus for lifting weights, straining a rope, etc.

BOLLARD
A heavy piece of wood or metal set in the deck of a vessel or on the dock to which the mooring lines are made fast. They are also called nigger heads.

BRACE
A spar connecting two others to give support and strength.

BRACE AND BIT
A tool used by carpenters for boring holes.

BRAID
To plat, plait or interweave strands, yarns, ropes or cords.

BRUSHWOOD
A thicket, underwood, loppings of branches.

BUTT
The larger end of a spar.

CABLE
A heavy rope used in attaching anchors or in towing. A cable is also a nautical measure of length.

CABLE-LAID
Rope made up of three ropes laid up left-handed; the ropes comprising the strands being laid up right-handed.

CATCH A TURN
To take a turn, as around a capstan, usually for holding temporarily.

CHOCK, CHOCK-A- BLOCK
When two blocks are pulled so close together that no further movement in the same direction is possible.

CLEAT
A heavy piece of wood or metal having two horns around which ropes may be made fast or belayed. Usually secured by bolts or lashings to some fixed object.

COIR ROPE
Rope made from coir fibres. It is extremely light in weight but is not as strong as rope or cable made from the other common rope materials.

CORDAGE
A collective term for ropes, usually referring to cords and lines less than one inch in circumference.

CORE
A small rope running through the centre of heavier rope. It is usually found in four-strand rope, lending to it a smooth, round outside appearance.

CRINGLE
A piece of rope spliced into an eye over a thimble.

DERRICK
A single spar or post used for hoisting weights.

FAKE
A circle or coil of rope in which the coils overlap and the rope is free for running. Also “to fake down” a rope is to coil down a rope.

FALL
A rope, which with the blocks makes up a tackle. A fall has both a hauling part and a standing part, the latter being the end secured to the tail of the block. In some cases only the hauling part is considered as the fall.

FRAPPING TURNS
Turns of a rope taken at right angles to the others to tighten a lashing.

FREE END
The end of a rope which is free for working, sometimes referred to as the running end.

GAFF
A spar lashed across a mast, usually to support a sail.

GROMMETT
Eyelets made of rope, leather, metal, and other materials. Their chief uses are as eyelets secured to canvas and sails through which stops or robands are passed.

GUY
A rope to steady a load in hoisting or any rope used for steadying purposes.

GYN
An apparatus consisting of three spars lashed in a tripod, used for hoisting weights.

HAFT
The wooden handle of an axe.

HALYARD
A rope for hoisting or lowering yards, sails, flags, and the like.

HAULING PART
That part of the rope in a tackle which is hauled upon, or it might be described as the end of the falls or a rope to which power is applied.

HAWSER
Any large rope, five or more inches in circumference, used principally for kedging, warping, and towing.

HAWSER- LAID
Left-handed rope of nine strands laid up in the form of three, three-stranded, right-handed ropes.

HEEL
The butt, or thick end of a spar.

HEW
To cut with an axe.

HEWING AND SCORING
Smoothing the face of a log by cutting with an axe.

HITCH
A species of knot by which a rope is bent to a hook, spar, or other rope; does not hold its position by itself.

HOLDFAST
An anchorage.

KINK
A twist in a rope.

KNOT
Strictly speaking, a knot is formed in the end of a rope. The word is loosely used to describe bends and hitches.

LASH, TO
To fasten or bind with a rope or cord.

LASHING
A rope or cord by which anything is secured.

LAY
The direction in which the strands of a rope are twisted. This may be right-handed or clockwise, or left-handed, or counter-clockwise. It also refers to the degree of tightness with which the strands are twisted, as soft, medium, common, plain and hard lay. Also used in the expressions “against the lay” and “with the lay” as denoting a direction contrary to or with the lay of the strands of the rope.

LEDGER
A horizontal spar across the bottom of the legs of a trestle.

MARLINE SPIKE
A pointed wooden or iron pin used to open the strands of a rope when splicing.

MARRY
Binding two lines together temporarily, either side by side or end to end.

MAUL
A heavy wooden hammer.

MOUSE, TO;
To close the mouth of a hook with MOUSING cord as a safety measure.

PARBUCKLE
A double sling usually made by passing the two ends of a rope under the object to be moved.

PARCEL
To protect a rope from the weather by winding strips of canvas or other material round it with the lay preparatory to serving.

PICKET
A pointed stake, post, or peg.

PURLIN
A horizontal timber resting on the principal rafters.

REEVE
To pass the end of a rope through an eye or an opening, as through a block, thimble, or bight.

SADDLE
A piece of sacking placed above a lashing to protect it from being frayed.

SCORE, TO
To make a cut in a log.

SCORING; HEWING
Smoothing the face of a log by cutting with an axe.

SHEAVE
The roller of a tackle block.

SHEER, SHEER LEGS
An apparatus consisting of two spars secured at the top for hoisting heavy weights or to act as a support.

SHINGLES
Thin tiles of wood.

SISAL
A kind of hemp, a cordage used for light lashings.

SLING
A band, loop, or other arrangement of rope for suspending, hoisting or transferring anything.

SNATCH BLOCK
A single block with an opening in one side to take the bight of a rope.

SPAR
A pole or piece of round timber.

STOP, TO
To tie down the coils of a rope.

STROP
A ring of rope used to secure a hook to an anchorage.

TACKLE
An arrangement of ropes and blocks, sometimes called block and tackle, for lifting, hoisting, or pulling.

TIP
The point or thin end of a spar.

TOGGLE
A small wooden pin made of hardwood which is inserted into a knot to make it more secure or to make it more readily and quickly unfastened.

TRANSOM
A horizontal spar across the top of the legs of a trestle.

TRESTLE
An open braced framework of timber for supporting the horizontal portion of abridge, etc.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s