Google’s Crisis Map For Disasters

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When disaster strikes, people turn to the internet for information and during natural disasters the Internet has sprung into action with some great resources.

Google has rolled out an interactive map so you can trace disasters throughout the country. In addition to tracking, you can get public alerts such as evacuation notices,radar and cloud imagery, evacuation routes and information on shelter locations and more.

The map displays information about current crises and events for which the Google Crisis Response team has collected geographic information. The data comes from a variety of sources, including official information sources and user-generated content.

During Super Storm Sandy Google launched a special Sandy crisis map for New York City, displaying such info as evacuation zones, evacuation centers and Red Cross emergency shelters.

If you or a loved one might be affected by a disaster, the Google Crisis Map is an extremely helpful tool and is going to be something worth bookmarking and checking often. The map tracks multiple types of disasters, letting users choose between several layers of information, such as the current locations of disasters, forecast track, shelter locations, cloud imagery, public alerts and more.

Using the map
The basics

1. Get started by visiting here.

2. Choose a map: The large red text at the top shows you which map is showing. Choose a different map using the drop-down arrow right next to the map name, or enter a location in the white box within the map itself.

3. Choose information to show: Check the box next to each layer that you’d like to see on the map, such as “Public Alerts” or “US Storm Reports.” Check the box again to remove that information from your map. You can hide the panel of layers by clicking the arrow at the top right of the page.

Devices: You can see disaster maps on your mobile phone, tablet, desktop computer, or laptop. Maps are automatically adjusted to work well on smaller screens.

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